Table of Contents

  • DAIUKKU

    Cross-Reference

    See DEIOCES.

  • DAIVA

    Clarisse Herrenschmidt and Jean Kelllens

    Old Iranian noun (Av. daēuua-, OPers. daiva-) corresponding to the title devá- of the Indian gods and thus reflecting the Indo-European heritage (*deiu̯ó-).

  • DAIVADANA

    Gherardo Gnoli

    lit., "temple of the daivas," Old Persian term that appears in the “daiva inscrip­tion” of Xerxes at Persepolis.

  • DAJJĀL

    Hamid Algar

    lit. "the great deceiver"; in Islamic tradition the maleficent figure gifted with supernatural powers whose advent and brief, though quasi-universal, rule will be among the signs heralding the approach of the resurrection.

  • ḎAKAʾ-AL-MOLK

    Cross-Reference

    See FORŪḠĪ, MOḤAMMAD-ʿALĪ; FORŪḠĪ, MOḤAMMAD-ḤOSAYN.

  • DAKANĪ, REŻĀ ʿALĪŠĀH

    Javad Nurbakhsh

    also known as Shah ʿAlī-Reżā (1683-1799), leader (qoṭb, lit., “pole”) in the years 1741-99 of the Neʿmat-­Allāhī Sufi order in Hyderabad (Deccan), India.

  • DAKANĪ, SAYYED MĪR ʿABD AL ḤAMĪD MAʿSḭŪM ʿALISĀH

    Hamid Algar

    (ca. 1738-97), the “renewer” (mojadded) of the Neʿmat-Allāhī Sufi order in Persia and thus the initiatory ancestor of all present­-day Neʿmat-Allāhīs.

  • DAḴĪL

    Ḥosayn-ʿAlī Beyhaqī

    lit. “interceder”; a piece of rag or cord or a lock fastened (daḵīl bastan) on a sacred place or object, for example, the railing around a saint’s tomb or grave or a public fountain (saqqā-ḵāna), the branch of a tree considered sacred, or another plant, in order to obtain a desired benefit.

  • ḎAḴĪRA-YE ḴᵛĀRAZMŠĀHĪ

    ʿAlī-Akbar Saʿīdī Sīrjānī

    early 13th-century Persian ency­clopedia of medical knowledge compiled by Sayyed Esmāʿīl b. Ḥosayn Jorjānī.

  • DAḴMA

    Cross-Reference

    See CORPSE.