Table of Contents

  • DĀNEŠ-NĀMA-YE QADAR KHAN

    Solomon Bayevsky

    (Book of knowledge [dedicated to] Qadar Khan), a Persian dictionary compiled by Ašrāf b. Šaraf Moḏakker Fārūḡī primarily in Malwa, India, and completed in 1405.

  • DĀNEŠ-SARĀ-YE ʿĀLĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See EDUCATION; TEACHERS' TRAINING.

  • DĀNEŠ-SARĀ-YE MOQADDAMĀTĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See EDUCATION.

  • DĀNESF(AH)ĀN

    Ehsan Yarshater

    locally Donesbon, a village located at 49°45′ E, 35°47′ N in the southern part of the Rāmand district of Qazvīn province, 30 km west and slightly north of Būyīn; it has a population of a little over 3,000.

  • DĀNEŠGĀH

    Cross-Reference

    See EDUCATION; entries on indi­vidual universities.

  • DĀNEŠGĀH-E JANG

    Cross-Reference

    See MILITARY.

  • DĀNEŠKADA

    Nassereddin Parvin

    a monthly literary journal published from April 1918 to April 1919 in Tehran by the distinguished poet, literary critic, and scholar Moḥammad-Taqi Malek-al-Šoʿarāʾ Bahār, considered the leading Persian literary figure of his time.

  • DĀNEŠKĀDA

    Cross-Reference

    See EDUCATION; FACULTIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TEHRAN.

  • DĀNEŠKĀDA-YE AFSARĪ

    Cross-reference

    See MILITARY.

  • DĀNEŠKADA-YE EṢFAHĀN

    N. Parvin

    a monthly literary journal and the organ of a society of the same name, published in two series in Isfahan by the poet and calligrapher Mirzā ʿAbbās Khan Dehkordi Šeydā (1882-1949).

  • DĀNEŠMAND

    Tahsin Yazici

    , Amir Ḡāzī Taylu Gümüš tigin Aḥmad (or Moḥammad) (d. 1104), founder of a Turkman dynasty in northern Cappadocia toward the end of the 11th century.

  • DĀNEŠMAND BAHĀDOR

    Peter Jackson

    Mongol com­mander (d. 1306).

  • DĀNEŠMAND-E ḤĀJEB

    Peter Jackson

    Muslim officer in Mongol service in the first half of the 13th century.

  • DANESTAMA

    Klaus Fischer

    a mud-brick structure on diaper masonry foundations located on the left bank of the Sorḵāb river, 34 km north of Doāb-e Mīḵzarīn on the road to Došī.

  • DĀNG

    Cross-Reference

    See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

  • DĀNĪĀL B. MOŠEH QŪMESĪ

    Amnon Netzer

    Persian Jewish scholar and exegete of the Karaite sect, the members of which rejected rabbinical writings later than the Bible itself.

  • DĀNĪĀL-E NABĪ

    Amnon Netzer, Nicholas Sims-Williams, Parvīz Varjāvand, Amnon Netzer

    Dānīāl is not mentioned in the Koran but is venerated as a prophet in Muslim tradition. Eschatological statements and the prophecy recounted in Daniel 12:12 (supposedly concerning the year 1335) have been interpreted by Jews as referring to the coming of the Messiah.

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  • DANISH-IRANIAN RELATIONS

    Cross-Reference

    See DENMARK.

  • DAQĀYEQĪ MARVAZĪ, ŠAMS-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    b. ʿAlī, the supposed author of a version of the Baḵtīār­nāma, who lived from the late 12th to the 13th century.

  • DAQĪQĪ, ABŪ MANṢŪR AḤMAD

    Djalal Khaleghi-Motlagh

     b. Aḥmad, one of the famous poets of the last years of the Samanid (819-1005) dynasty.

  • DAQQĀQ, ABŪ ʿALĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ABŪ ʿALĪ DAQQĀQ.

  • ḎARʿ

    cross-reference

    See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

  • DĀR AL- ḤARB

    Hamid Algar

    “the realm of war”; lands not under Islamic rule, a juridical term for certain non-­Muslim territory, though often construed, especially by Western writers, as a geopolitical concept implying the necessity for perpetual, even if generally latent, warfare between the Muslim state and its non-Muslim neighbors.

  • DĀR AL-FONŪN

    John Gurney and Negin Nabavi

    lit., “polytechnic college”; a college founded in Tehran in 1268/1851 by Mīrzā Ṭāqī Khan Amīr-e Kabīr, which marked the begin­ning of modern education in Persia.

  • DĀR AL-ŠŪRĀ-YE KOBRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See WEZĀRAT.

  • DĀR AL-ŻARB

    Cross-Reference

    See ŻARRĀB-ḴĀNA.

  • DĀR(- E) TANHĀ

    Ernie Haerinck

    lit., “the lonely tree”; an ar­cheological site in the district of Badr, near the village of Jabar, ca. 70 km east-southeast of Īlām, in the province of Pošt-e Kūh.

  • DAR-E MEHR

    Mary Boyce

    a Zoroastrian term first recorded in the Persian Rivāyats and Parsi Gujarati writings.

  • DĀRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀL-E BĀVAND.

  • DĀRA, MIRZĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿABDALLĀH MĪRZĀ DĀRĀ.

  • DĀRĀ (City)

    Michael Weiskopf

    the name of a Parthian city and of a Byzan­tine garrison town of the Sasanian period.

  • DĀRĀ ŠOKŌH

    Annemarie Schimmel

    (b. near Ajmer, 20 March 1615, d. Delhi, 12 August 1659), first son of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahān and his wife Momtāz Maḥall, religious thinker, mystic, poet, and author of a number of works in Persian.

  • DĀRĀ(B) (1)

    Aḥmad Tafażżolī

    or DĀRĀB, the name of two kings of the legendary Kayanid dynasty.

  • DĀRĀB (2)

    Massoud Kheirabadi, Dietrich Huff, Georgina Herrmann

    the name Dārāb refers both to a šahrestān (subprovince) of Fārs province and to its chief city.

  • DĀRĀB-NĀMA

    William L. Hanaway

    prose romance of the 12th century, by Abū Ṭāher Moḥammad b. Ḥasan b. ʿAlī b. Mūsā Ṭārsūsī (or Ṭarṭūsī), in which the adventures of the legendary Kayanid king Dārāb, son of Bahman (also called Ardašīr) and Homāy, variously identified as the daughter of king Sām Čāraš of Egypt or of Ardašīr (=Bahman), are recounted.

  • DĀRĀBGERD

    Cross-Reference

    See Dārā(b) II.

  • DĀRĀBĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See CITRUS FRUITS.

  • DĀRĀBĪ SAYYED JAʿFAR

    Andrew J. Newman

    b. Abī Esḥāq Mūsawī Borūjerdī Kašfī (b. Eṣṭahbānāt in Fārs, 1775, d. Borūjerd 1851), religious scholar, nephew of the Aḵbārī Yūsuf b. Aḥmad Baḥrānī and father of Sayyed Yaḥyā Waḥīd Dārābī.

  • DĀRĀBĪ SAYYED YAḤYĀ

    Moojan Momen

    (b. Yazd, ca. 1811, d. Neyrīz, 1850), Babi leader usually known as Waḥīd (unique), a title given him by the Bāb; the eldest son of Sayyed Jaʿfar Kašfī Eṣṭah-bānātī, he received a Muslim religious education and, like his father, was associated with the Qajar court.

  • DARABPAHLAN, DASTUR

    Kaikhusroo M. JamaspAsa

    Zoroastrian priest and author (b. Navsari, Gujarat, 1668, d. Navsari, 1 September 1734), eldest son of Pahlan Fredoon, who was accorded the title “dastur” (high priest) and the privilege of occupying the second chair in the Zoroastrian assembly of the small port of Navsari in 1670 or perhaps earlier.

  • DARAFŠ -E KĀVĪĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See DERĀFŠ-E KĀVĪĀN.

  • DĀRĀʾĪ, WEZĀRAT

    Cross-Reference

    See FINANCE MINISTRY.

  • DARĀMAD

    Jean During

    lit., “introduction”; an episode in the course of a musical performance, the nature and length of which vary with the material introduced.

  • DARARIĀN, Vigen

    Morteżā Ḥoseyni Dehkordi

    (1929-2003) renowned pop singer and performer on the guitar.

  • DARĀZ-DAST

    Cross-Reference

    See DERĀZ-DAST; ARDAŠĪR; BAHMAN (2).

  • DARB -E EMĀM

    Parvīz Varjāvand

    large shrine complex in the old Sonbolestān quarter of Isfahan. The main structure, consisting of entrance portal (sar-dar), vestibule, and tomb, was built in 1453 and expanded and modified several times during the Safavid period.

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  • DARBĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See BĀR; COURTS AND COURTIERS.

  • DARBAND (1)

    Erich Kettenhofen

    (Ar. Bāb al-Abwāb), ancient city in Dāḡestān on the western shore of the Caspian Sea, located at the entrance to the narrow pass between the Caucasus foothills and the sea.

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  • DARBAND (2)

    Bernard Hourcade

    a former village in the summer resort (yeylāq) of Šamīrān, situated at an elevation of 1,700 m on the extreme northern edge of the capital, where the Alborz foothills begin.

  • DARBANDĪ, MULLA ĀQĀ

    Hamid Algar

    b. ʿĀbed b. Ramażān, commonly known as Fāżel Darbandī (d. Tehran, 1869-70), Shiʿite scholar and preacher of the Qajar period, renowned for his disputatious and irascible character.