Table of Contents

  • DIMLĪ

    Garnik S. Asatrian

    or Zāzā; the indigenous name of an Iranian people living mainly in eastern Anatolia, in the Dersim region (present-day Tunceli) between Erzincan in the north and the Muratsu in the south, the far western part of historical Upper Armenia.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • DĪN MOḤAMMAD KHAN

    EIr

    b. Olūs Khan, the Uzbek prince who, with his brother ʿAlī Solṭān, joined Shah Ṭahmāsb’s camp in 943/1536-37 during the latter’s campaign in Khorasan against ʿObayd-Allāh Khan, the Uzbek ruler of Bukhara.

  • DĪN WA’L-ḤAYĀT, AL-

    Nassereddin Parvin

    a bi-weekly religious magazine published in Tabrīz, 1928-31, replacing another Tabrīz religious magazine, Taḏakkorāt-e dīnī.

  • DINAR

    Philippe Gignoux, Michael Bates

    a gold coin, in pre-Islamic times struck mainly for purposes of prestige. In Arabic of the classical Islamic period, the word dīnār had the double sense of a gold coin and of a monetary unit which might not be precisely embodied by actual coins.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • DĪNĀR, MALEK

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    b. Moḥammad (d. 1195), a leader of the Oghuz Turkmen in Khorasan and, in the latter years of the 12th century, ruler of Kermān.

  • DĪNĀRĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See BAḴTĪĀRĪ.

  • DĪNAVAR

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    (occasionally vocalized Daynavar), in the first centuries of Islam an important town in Jebāl, now ruined.

  • DĪNAVARĪ, ABŪ ḤANĪFA AḤMAD

    Charles Pellat

    b. Dāwūd b. Vanand (d. between 894 and 903), grammarian, lexicographer, astronomer, mathematician, and Islamic traditionist of Persian origin, who lived at Dīnavar and in several cities in Iraq in the 9th century.

  • DĪNAVARĪ, ABŪ MOḤAMMAD ʿABD-ALLĀH

    Josef van Ess

    b. Ḥamdān b. Wahb b. Bešr (d. 902), traditionist and ḥāfeẓ (preserver of the Koranic text).

  • DĪNAVARĪ, ABŪ MOḤAMMAD ʿABD-ALLĀH

    Josef van Ess

    b. Mobārak (d. first half of the 10th century), author of a tafsīr (koranic exegesis) entitled al-Wāżeḥ fī tafsīr al-Qorʾān, which is preserved in several manuscripts.

  • DĪNĀVARĪYA

    Werner Sundermann

    in Manichean usage originally “the elect.”

  • DINKHA TEPE

    Cross-Reference

    See DENḴĀ TEPE.

  • DINON

    Wolfgang Felix

    (fl. approximately 360-30 B.C.E.), author of a historical work on the Ancient Orient.

  • DĪNŠĀH

    Cross-Reference

    See IRANI, DINSHAH JIJIBHOY.

  • DIO CASSIUS

    Marie Louise Chaumont

    (more correctly, Cassius Dio; b. Nicea, Bithynia, ca. 160, d. Nicea, after 229), Roman official whose Rhomaikē Historia is important for the study of Parthian history.

  • DIO CHRYSOSTOM

    Cross-Reference

    See DIO COCCEIANUS.

  • DIO COCCEIANUS

    Roger Beck

    surnamed Chrysostom ("golden-mouthed"), a traveling scholar who in his 36th Oration (known as the “Borysthenian” or “Olbian” from its dramatic setting), written about 100 C.E., purports to summarize a hymn composed by Zoroaster and sung by the magi in secret rites.

  • DIODORUS SICULUS

    Ernst Badian

    Greek historian from Agyrium in Sicily, hence called Siculus (the Sicilian) who came to Rome in the middle of the first century B.C.E. and there wrote his Bibliotheca Historica, a universal history in forty books, from the origins to the age of Caesar.

  • DIODOTUS

    Osmund Bopearachchi

    satrap of Bactria-Sogdiana, who revolted against his Seleucid soverign Antiochus II and proclaimed himself king, thus laying the foundation of the Graeco-Bactrian kingdom. The date of his revolt has been  placed between 256 and 239 B.C., the majority of scholars arguing for about the year 250.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • DIOGENES LAERTIUS

    Wolfgang Felix

    author of a biographically arranged history of Greek philosophy in ten books that also deals with the Persian Magi, especially in the first book on the origins of philosophy.