Table of Contents

  • DĪBĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ABRĪŠAM.

  • DĪBĀ, MAḤMŪD KHAN

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿALĀʾ-al-MOLK.

  • DIBĪR

    Cross-Reference

    See DABĪR.

  • DICHŌR

    Erich Kettenhofen

    city conquered by Šāpūr I (240-70) during his second campaign against Rome in 253, as recorded in his inscription at Kaʿba-ye Zardošt.

  • DICKSON, MARTIN BERNARD

    Kathryn Babayan

    (b. Brooklyn, 22 March 1924, d. Princeton, 14 May 1991), Iranist and Central Asianist who specialized in Safavid history.

  • DICTIONARIES

    ʿAlī Ašraf Ṣādeqī, John R. Perry, Ḥosayn Sāmeʿī

    The first extant Persian dictionary is Lōḡat-e fors of the poet Asadī Ṭūsī (q.v.). Entries are arranged according to their final letters and illustrated by examples from poetry. Over ten manuscripts are known to have reached us, all of which differ in the number of entries and verses as well as the entry definitions.

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  • DIDYMA

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    (Gk. tà Dídyma, probably of Carian origin), district ca. 20 km south of the Ionian Miletus and site of a pre-Greek sanctuary of Apollo, to which a famous oracle was attached.

  • DIEU, LOUIS (LUDOVICUS) DE

    J.T.P. de Bruijn

    (b. Vlissingen, Flushing, April 7, 1590; d. Leiden, Dec. 23, 1642), Dutch orientalist.

  • DIEULAFOY, JANE HENRIETTE MAGRE

    Jean Calmard

    (b. Toulouse, 29 June 1851, d. Château de Langlade, Haute-Garonne, 25 May 1916), French archeologist, explorer, folklorist, novelist, playwright, and journalist.

  • DIEULAFOY, MARCEL-AUGUSTE

    Pierre Amiet

    (b. Toulouse, 3 August 1844, d. Paris, 25 February 1920), French archeologist.

  • DIEZ, ERNST

    Jens Kröger

    (b. 27 January 1878, d. 8 July 1961), Austrian historian of Iranian and Islamic art.

  • DIGOR

    F. Thordarson

    Ossetic tribal name.

  • DILL

    Hūšang Aʿlam

    Anethum graveolens L. (fam. Umbellifera), an herb widely cultivated in Persia.

  • DIMDIM

    Amir Hassanpour

    name of a mountain and a fortress where an important battle between the Kurds and the Safavid army took place in the early 17th century.

  • DIMLĪ

    Garnik S. Asatrian

    or Zāzā; the indigenous name of an Iranian people living mainly in eastern Anatolia, in the Dersim region (present-day Tunceli) between Erzincan in the north and the Muratsu in the south, the far western part of historical Upper Armenia.

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  • DĪN MOḤAMMAD KHAN

    EIr

    b. Olūs Khan, the Uzbek prince who, with his brother ʿAlī Solṭān, joined Shah Ṭahmāsb’s camp in 943/1536-37 during the latter’s campaign in Khorasan against ʿObayd-Allāh Khan, the Uzbek ruler of Bukhara.

  • DĪN WA’L-ḤAYĀT, AL-

    Nassereddin Parvin

    a bi-weekly religious magazine published in Tabrīz, 1928-31, replacing another Tabrīz religious magazine, Taḏakkorāt-e dīnī.

  • DINAR

    Philippe Gignoux, Michael Bates

    a gold coin, in pre-Islamic times struck mainly for purposes of prestige. In Arabic of the classical Islamic period, the word dīnār had the double sense of a gold coin and of a monetary unit which might not be precisely embodied by actual coins.

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  • DĪNĀR, MALEK

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    b. Moḥammad (d. 1195), a leader of the Oghuz Turkmen in Khorasan and, in the latter years of the 12th century, ruler of Kermān.

  • DĪNĀRĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See BAḴTĪĀRĪ.