Table of Contents

  • BAYĀŻ

    M.-T. Dānešpažūh

    literally “white,” usually a small paper notepad that opens lengthwise and was carried around in an inside pocket. Several such MS are found in various libraries.

  • BAYAZIT

    R. W. Edwards

    (Bāyazīd; Osm. Bayezid), a stronghold located three kilometers southeast of the modern village of Doğubayazit, Turkey, and approximately twenty-five kilometers southwest of Mt. Ararat, important in the defense of Anatolia against invasion from Iran.

  • BĀYBŪRTLŪ

    P. Oberling

    (also Bāybūrdlū), a Turkic tribe of northwestern Iran whose only vestiges seem to be the names of a few historical personalities.

  • BĀYDŪ

    B. Spuler

    a son of Ṭaraḡāy and grandson of Hülegü (Hūlāgū), reigned as il-khan in Iran, 1295.

  • BAYHAQ

    C. E. Bosworth

    a rural area (rostāq) of medieval Khorasan, between the district of Nīšāpūr and the eastern borders of Qūmes, and its town, also known as Sabzavār.

  • BAYHAQĪ, ABU’L-FAŻL

    Ḡ.-Ḥ. Yūsofī

    MOḤAMMAD B. ḤOSAYN, secretary at the Ghaznavid court and renowned Persian historian (995-1077).

  • BAYHAQĪ, ABU’L-ḤASAN MOḤAMMAD

    H. Halm

    B. ŠOʿAYB ʿEJLĪ NAYSĀBŪRĪ (d. 936), a jurist who helped promote the spread of the Shafeʿite school of Islamic law in Khorasan.

  • BAYHAQĪ, EBRĀHĪM

    C. E. Bosworth

    B. MOḤAMMAD, 10th-century Arabic littérateur, author of a work of adab.

  • BAYHAQĪ, ẒAHĪR-AL-DĪN

    H. Halm

    ABU’L-ḤASAN ʿALĪ B. ZAYD (ca. 1097-1169), also known as Ebn Fondoq, an Iranian polymath of Arab descent, author of the Tārīḵ-e Bayhaq.

  • BĀYJŪ

    P. Jackson

    Mongol general and military governor in northwestern Iran (fl. 1228-1259). He belonged to the Besüt tribe and was a kinsman of Jengiz Khan’s general Jebe (Jaba).