Table of Contents

  • BĀBIRUŠ

    Cross-Reference

    See BABYLON.

  • BABISM

    D. M. MacEoin

    a 19th-century messianic movement in Iran and Iraq under the overall charismatic leadership of Sayyed ʿAlī-Moḥammad Šīrāzī, the Bāb (1819-1850). Babism was the only significant millenarian movement in Shiʿite Islam during the 19th century.

  • BĀBŌĒ

    A. Vööbus

    catholicos (d. 481 or 484), orthodox leader of the Christian church in Iran under Pērōz, one of Barṣaumā’s chief opponents. 

  • BĀBOL

    X. de Planhol, S. Blair

    town in Māzandarān, occupying a central position in the coastal plain. i. The town.  ii. Islamic monuments.

  • BĀBOLSAR

    X. de Planhol

    town on the Caspian coast in the province of Māzandarān.

  • BĀBOR

    M. E. Subtelny

    Timurid prince (1422-1457), the youngest son of Bāysonqor and a great-grandson of the conqueror Tīmūr.

  • BĀBOR, ẒAHĪR-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD

    F. Lehmann

    (1483-1530), Timurid prince, military genius, and literary craftsman, founder of the Mughal Empire in India.

  • BĀBORĪ

    D. Balland

    (or Bābor, Bābar; sing. Bāboray), a Paṧtūn tribe originally from the Solaymān mountains, now widely dispersed.

  • BABR

    P. Joslin

    “tiger.” The little evidence suggests only tentative differences between the Caspian tiger (Panthera tigris virgata) and the Indian tiger (P. t. tigris) or the Siberian tiger (P. t. altaica).

  • BABR-E BAYĀN

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    (or babr, also called palangīna), in the traditional history, the name of the coat which Rostam wore in combat.