Table of Contents

  • BOḴT-ARDAŠĪR

    Jes P. Asmussen

    name of a town (Mid. Pers. rōstāg) that Ardašīr I is said to have founded as an expression of his gratitude to God during his flight from the court of the last Parthian king, Ardawān.

  • BOḴT-NARSA

    cross-reference

    See NEBUCHADNEZZAR.

  • BOḴTĪŠŪʿ

    Lutz Richter-Bernburg

    the name of the eponymous ancestor of a Syro-Persian Nestorian family of physicians from Gondēšāpūr, Ḵūzestān, 8th-11th centuries, and of several of its members.

  • BOLANDMĀZŪ

    cross-reference

    See BALŪṬ.

  • BOLBOL “nightingale”

    Hūšang Aʿlam, Jerome W. Clinton

    “nightingale.” i. The bird. ii. In Persian literature. The term bolbol is applied to at least three species of the genus Luscinia (fam. Turdidae). To Persian poets, however, all refer to a single bird, characterized by its sweet  or plaintive song, supposedly sung for its beloved, the rose.

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  • BOLBOL, AŠRAF DAYRĪ

    Giri L. Tikku

    Persian poet of Kashmir (1682-1775-6).

  • BOLOD

    Bertold Spuler

    CHʿENG-HSIANG (Pers. Pūlād Čīnksāng; d. 1313), the representative of the Great Khan Qubilai at the court of the Il-khans of Iran.

  • BOLOḠĀN ḴĀTŪN

    Charles Melville

    (Būlūḡān Ḵātūn), the name of three of the royal wives of the Mongol Il-khans in Iran. Of Mongol origin, the word Boloḡān, variously spelled in the Persian sources, means “sable.”

  • BOLŪḠ

    cross-reference

    See BĀLEḠ.

  • BOLŪR

    cross-reference

    (Ar. ballūr, bellawr) “rock crystal.” See CRYSTAL.

  • BOMBAY

    John R. Hinnells, Momin Mohiuddin and Ismail K. Poonawala

    Persian communities of Bombay.

  • BOMBAY PARSI PANCHAYAT

    John R. Hinnells

    the largest Zoroastrian institution in modern history, originally founded in the 17th century in order to maintain Zoroastrian family and social values at a time of dramatic change, when Parsis were migrating from rural Gujarat to cosmopolitan Bombay.

  • BONDĀR RĀZĪ

    Zabihollah Safa

    (or Pendār), poet in the 10th-11th centuries, named as the author of a small number of surviving poems, some in literary (Darī) Persian, others in his local dialect.

  • BONDĀRĪ, FATḤ B. ʿALĪ

    Cross-Reference

    b. Moḥammad EṢFAHĀNĪ. See SUPPLEMENT.

  • BONGĀH-E ḤEMĀYAT-E MĀDARĀN O KŪDAKĀN

    EIr

    (Institute for the protection of mothers and infants), founded 16 December 1940 on the order of Reżā Shah, originally funded by charitable contributions.

  • BONGĀH-E MOSTAQELL-E ĀBYĀRĪ

    EIr

    (Inde­pendent irrigation agency), established by the Majles on 19 May 1943 to improve irrigation in Iran.

  • BONGĀH-E TARJOMA WA NAŠR-E KETĀB

    Edward Joseph

    “The [Royal] Institute for Translation and Publication,” founded 1953, since 1986 called the Scientific and Cultural Publication Company (Šerkat-e Entešārāt-e ʿElmī wa Farhangī).

  • BONĪČA

    Willem Floor

    a tax assessed on a group as a single unit and particularly the base on which the tax was calculated—in Iran: a tax on guilds, an agricultural tax on villages and tribes, and a military tax on villages.

  • BONYĀD-E FARHANG-E ĪRĀN

    Aḥmad Tafażżolī

    The "Iranian Culture Foundation" was established 16 September 1964.

  • BONYĀD-E MOSTAŻʿAFĀN

    cross-reference

    See MOSTAZ­AFAN FOUNDATION.