Table of Contents

  • BĀBAK ḴORRAMI

    Ḡ. -Ḥ. Yūsofī

    leader of the Ḵorramdīnī or Ḵorramī uprising in Azerbaijan in the early 9th century (d. 838), which engaged the forces of the caliph for 20 years before it was crushed in 837.

  • BĀBAKĪYA

    Cross-Reference

    See ḴORRAMĪS.

  • BABAN

    C. E. Bosworth

    (or Bavan), a small town in the medieval Islamic province of Bāḏḡīs, to the north and west of Herat.

  • BĀBĀN

    W. Behn

    (or Baban), Kurdish princely family in Solaymānīya, ruling an area in Iraqi Kurdistan and western Iran (17th—19th centuries) and actively involved in the Perso-Ottoman struggles.

  • BĀBĀN DYNASTY

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀL-E BĀBĀN.

  • BĀBAY

    A. Vööbus

    catholicos of the Persian Church elected at the synod at Seleucia in 497 (d. 502).

  • BĀBAY OF NISIBIS

    N. Sims-Williams

    Christian Syriac writer who flourished about the beginning of the seventh century CE; a homily of his is attested in Sogdian.

  • BĀBAY THE GREAT

    A. Vööbus

    (d. 628), abbot and prominent leader in the Nestorian church in Iran under Ḵosrow II.

  • BĀBEL

    Cross-Reference

    See BABYLON.

  • BABILLA, ASHUR BANIPAL IBRAHIM

    Khosro Shayesteh

    In acting also, just as did Artaud, Bani placed heavy emphasis on invoking deeply rooted feelings of the actors and argued that “while actors are wearing masks in their daily lives, in theater, these masks are torn off and we are facing the inner self of the actor.”

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