Table of Contents

  • BŌĒ

    Marie Louise Chaumont

    (Gk. Boēs), the name of two of Kavād’s (r. 488-­96 and 498-531) generals.

  • BOḠĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See BŪQĀ.

  • BOḠRĀ KHAN

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    , ABŪ MŪSĀ HĀRŪN, the first Qarakhanid khan to invade the Samanid emirate from the steppes to the north in the 990s.

  • BOHLŪL

    L. P. Elwell-Sutton

    a weekly comic illustrated paper, published in Tehran from 1911.

  • BOHLŪL, ABŪ WOHAYB

    Ulrich Marzolph

    , b. ʿAmr b. Moḡīra Majnūn Kūfī (d. ca. 805), variously cited in later Persian literature as Bohlūl-e majnūn (Bohlūl the fool) or Bohlūl-e dānā (Bohlūl the wise), the archetype of the "wise fool"  genre.

  • BOHRĀS

    cross-reference

     See ISMAʿILISM xvi. MODERN ISMAʿILI COMMUNITIES.

  • BOḤŪR AL-ALḤĀN

    Taqī Bīneš, Jean During

    (Meters of melodies), a treatise on Persian music and prosody by Sayyed Mīrzā Moḥammad-Naṣīr Forṣat Šīrāzī (1855-1920).

  • BOIR AḤMADĪ

    Reinhold Loeffler, Gernot L. Windfuhr

    the largest of the six tribal groups of Kūhgīlūya, inhabiting the mountainous territory from east of Behbahān and north of Dogonbadān to the Kūh-e Denā range in the northeast, an area of some 2,500 sq miles.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • BOJNŪRD

    Eckart Ehlers, C. Edmund Bosworth

    a town and district in Khorasan. i. The town and district. ii. History. The town (1976: 47,719 inhabitants; lat  37°29’ N, long 57°17’ E)  is situated at the foot of the Ālādāḡ.

  • BOJNURD iii. Basic Population Data, 1956-2011

    Mohammad Hossein Nejatian

    Bojnurd has experienced a high rate of population growth, increasing more than tenfold from 1956 to 2011. During the period 1956-76, the average annual growth rate was approximately 4.5 percent. From 1976 to 1986, the population growth rate almost doubled. After the war with Iraq ended, the population growth started to decline. Since 1996, it has continued to decrease, falling to 2.48 percent in the years 2006-2011.

  • BOḴĀRĀ

    cross-reference

    See BUKHARA.

  • BOḴĀRĀ-YE ŠARĪF

    Michael Zand

    “Boḵārā the noble,” the first Central Asian newspaper published in Persian, 1912 to 1913.

  • BOḴĀRĪ, ʿABD-AL-KARĪM

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿABD-AL-­KARĪM BOḴĀRĪ.

  • BOḴĀRĪ, ʿALĀʾ-AL-DĪN

    Wilferd Madelung

    ABŪ ʿABD-ALLĀH MOḤAMMAD b. ʿAbd-al-Raḥmān b. Aḥmad, Hanafite scholar of feqh, legal method, kalām theology, and preacher and moftī in Bukhara (d. 1151).

  • BOḴĀRĪ, ʿALĀʾ-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD

    Hamid Algar

    b. Moḥammad (d. 1400), close associate and primary successor of Bahāʾ-al-Dīn Naqš­band, the eponym of the Naqšbandī Sufi order.

  • BOḴĀRĪ, AMĪR AḤMAD

    Hamid Algar

    (d. 1516), a Sufi instrumental in establishing the Naqšbandī order in Turkey.

  • BOḴĀRĪ, JALĀL-AL-DĪN

    Richard M. Eaton

    , SHAIKH, popularly known as Maḵdūm-e Jahānīān and Jahāngašt, a celebrated Indo-Persian Sufi of Uch in the southern Punjab (1308-84).

  • BOḴĀRĪ, MOḤAMMAD-ŠARĪF

    Robert D. McChesney

    , ĀḴŪND MOLLĀ, also known as Šarīf-e Boḵārī and Mollā Šarīf, the leading Koran exegete and traditionist in Transoxiana (late 17th century).

  • BOKĀVOL

    David O. Morgan

    (büke’ül), a term used in the Il-khanid period and after for a royal food taster or, later and more commonly, a military commissariat officer.

  • BOKAYR B. MĀHĀN

    ʿAbbās Zaryāb

    MARVAZĪ, ABŪ HĀŠEM (d. 745-46), a leading ʿAbbasid propagandist (dāʿī).