Table of Contents

  • BANĪ LĀM

    J. Perry

    a numerous and historically important Shiʿite Arab tribe of northwestern Ḵūzestān, southern Lorestān, and adjacent parts of Iraq.

  • BANĪ SĀLA

    J. Perry

    a Shiʿite Arab tribe of Howayza (Ḥawīza) district in Ḵūzestān.

  • BANĪ TAMĪM

    J. Perry

    an Arab tribe of western Ḵūzestān, both settled and nomadic, raising sheep and camels. Their range lies between Howayza and Ahvāz.

  • BANĪ ṬOROF

    J. Perry

    (Banu Turuf), a large Shiʿite Arab tribe of Howayza (Ḥawīza) district in Ḵūzestān, mostly sedentary, centered north of Howayza between Sūsangerd and Bostān (Besaytīn).

  • BANISTER, Thomas

    Parvin Loloi

    (d. Arrash, 20 July 1571), British merchant and traveler to Persia who commanded the fifth voyage from Britain to Persia via Russia for the purpose of establishing trade. 

  • BĀNK-E MARKAZĪ-E ĪRĀN

    M. Yeganeh

    (Central Bank of Iran), a bank established under the Iranian Banking and Monetary Act of 28 May 1960 to undertake the central banking activities in the country. The functions and powers of Bānk-e Markazī were revised following the Islamic Revolution of February, 1979, which led to the nationalization of private banking.

  • BANKING

    P. Basseer, P. Clawson and W. Floor

    The first modern bank in Iran was the British-owned New Oriental Bank, which in 1888 opened in Tehran, Mašhad, Tabrīz, Rašt, Isfahan, Shiraz, and Būšehr. The New Oriental Bank was shortly replaced by another British-owned bank, the Imperial Bank of Persia (1889), which was to remain a major financial institution for more than six decades.

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  • BANNĀʾĪ

    C. Bromberger

    While the term bannāʾī covers the entire construction field, in this brief study domestic building techniques, in particular, which are more or less part of the traditional crafts, and the recent evolution of popular housing will be emphasized.

  • BANNERS

    A. S. Melikian-Chirvani

    (ʿalam, derafš). Countless references in epic literature as well as in chronicles show that, in the clouds of dust that enveloped troops as they fought in sandy land, the glitter of the banner was the only way that warriors had of following the moves of their commanders or of identifying the enemy.

  • BĀNŪ

    W. Eilers

    originally “lady,” now also in common use as an alternative to ḵānom “Madam, Mrs.” (from Turkish xan-ım “my lord”).

  • BANŪ ʿABBĀS

    Cross-Reference

    See ABBASID CALIPHATE.

  • BANŪ AMĀJŪR

    D. Pingree

    (or MĀJŪR), ABU’L-QĀSEM ʿABD-ALLĀH  and his son Abu’l-Ḥasan ʿAlī, 10th-century astronomers.

  • BANŪ ʿANNĀZ

    cross-reference

    See ʿANNAZIDS.

  • BANŪ LAḴM

    Cross-Reference

    See ḤIRA.

  • BANŪ MĀJŪR

    cross-reference

    See BANŪ AMĀJŪR.

  • BANŪ MONAJJEM

    D. Pingree

    a family of intellectuals, closely connected to the caliphs of the 9th-10th centuries and claiming descent from an ancient Iranian lineage.

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  • BANŪ MŪSĀ

    D. Pingree

    name applied to three brothers, 9th-century ʿAbbasid astronomers and engineers.

  • BANŪ OMAYYA

    cross-reference

    See OMMAYADS.

  • BĀNŪ PARS

    M. Boyce

    “Lady of Pārs,” the name of a Zoroastrian shrine in the mountains at the northern end of the Yazd plain.

  • BANŪ SĀJ

    W. Madelung

    a family named after its ancestor Abu’l-Sāj which served the ʿAbbasid caliphate (9tth-10th centuries).