Table of Contents

  • BAGAYAṞIČ

    R. H. Hewsen

    site of the great temple of Mihr (Mithras), one of the eight principal pagan shrines of pre-Christian Armenia, traditionally built by Tigranes II the Great (r. 95-56 B.C.).

  • BAGAZUŠTA

    R. Schmitt

    Old Iranian personal name *Baga-zušta- “beloved of the god(s)” attested in the Achaemenid period and after.

  • BAḠDĀD

    cross-reference

    See BAGHDAD.

  • BAḠDĀDI FAMILY

    Kamran Ekbal

    designation of an Arab family of a Bābi, Shaikh Moḥammad Šebl, and his Bahai progeny, his son Moḥammad-Moṣṭafā Baḡdādi, and the latter’s sons, Żiāʾ Mabsuṭ Baḡdādi and Ḥosayn Eqbāl.

  • BAḠDĀDĪ, ʿABD-AL-QĀHER

    J. van Ess

    B. ṬĀHER ŠĀFEʿĪ TAMĪMĪ (ca. 961-1038), mathematician, Shafeʿite jurist, and Asḥʿarite theologian.

  • BAḠDĀDĪ, ABU’L-FAŻL

    H. Algar

    (d. 1155), Sufi whose name appears in the initiatic chain of the Neʿmatallāhī order.

  • BAḠDĀDĪ, BAHĀʾ-AL-DĪN

    cross-reference

    See BAHĀʾ-AL-DĪN BAḠDĀDĪ.

  • BAḠDĀDĪ, ḴĀLED ŻĪĀʾ-AL-DĪN

    H. Algar

    , MAWLĀNĀ (1779-1827), the founder of a significant branch of the Naqšbandī Sufi order that has had a profound impact on his native Kurdistan and beyond.

  • BAGHDAD i. The Iranian Connection: Before the Mongol Invasion

    H. Kennedy

    Baghdad, whose official name was originally Madīnat-al-Salām, the City of Peace, was founded in 762 by the second ʿAbbasid caliph, Abū Jaʿfar al-Manṣūr as his official capital.

  • BAGHDAD ii. From the Mongol Invasion to the Ottoman Occupation

    ʿAbbās Zaryāb

    The Persian influence had increased in recent decades through Iranian viziers and officials serving the caliphs, the rise of Shiʿite power and their theological literature.