Table of Contents

  • BAHMAN YAŠT

    W. Sundermann

    Middle Persian apocalyptical text preserved in  Pahlavi script, a Pāzand (i.e., Middle Persian in Avestan script) transliteration, and a garbled New Persian translation.

  • BAHMAN-ARDAŠĪR

    M. Morony

    (or Forāt Maysān), ancient and medieval town and subdistrict in Maysān in lower Iraq. The town of Forāt is known from the first century A.D. as a fortified terminus for caravan trade on the left bank of the lower Tigris, eleven or twelve miles downstream from Charax.

  • BAHMAN-NĀMA

    W. L. Hanaway, Jr.

    epic poem in Persian of about 9,500 lines recounting the adventures of Bahman son of Esfandīār.

  • BAHMANAGĀN

    cross-reference

    See BAHMANJANA.

  • BAHMANBEYGI, MOHAMMAD

    Ḥassan Mirʿābedini

    (1922-2010), educator, writer, and founder of tribal education in Iran. He was born in the Bahmanbeyglu clan, a branch of the Qašqāʾi  tribe in Fars province, spent his childhood among the nomads, and graduated from the University of Tehran’s Faculty of Law and Political Sciences.

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  • BAHMANID DYNASTY

    N. H. Ansari

    dynasty (1347-1528) in the Deccan, the tableland region in India. The Bahmanid kingdom was not only the first independent Muslim kingdom in southern India, but it was also one of the greatest centers of Iranian culture in the subcontinent.

  • BAHMANJANA

    Z. Safa

    Arabicized form of Mid. Pers. Bahmanagān, one of the Zoroastrian festival days which Muslim Iranians observed down to the Mongol invasion in 1219.

  • BAHMANŠĪR

    X. de Planhol

    the name of the distributary which branches off the left bank of the Kārūn river in the Ḵūzestān plain a short distance above Ḵorramšahr, and of a dehestān near this town.

  • BAHMANYĀR, AḤMAD

    J. Matīnī

    scholar, educator, and man of letters (1884-1955). His written works are characterized by clarity and simplicity of language.

  • BAHMANYĀR, KĪĀ

    H. Daiber

    RAʾĪS ABU’L-ḤASAN B. MARZBĀN AʿJAMĪ ĀḎARBĀYJĀNĪ (d. 1066), one of Ebn Sīnā’s pupils and known mainly as a commentator and transmitter of Ebn Sīnā’s philosophy.

  • BAḤR

    cross-reference

    See BAḤR-E ṬAWĪL.

  • BAḤR-AL-ʿOLŪM

    H. Algar

    (1155/1742-1212/1797), a Shiʿite scholar who exercised great influence both in Iraq and in Iran through the numerous students he trained.  

  • BAḤR-E ḴAZAR

    cross-reference

    ḴAZAR. See CASPIAN SEA.

  • BAḤR-E ḴᵛĀRAZM

    cross-reference

    See ARAL SEA.

  • BAḤR-E ʿOMĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See OMAN, SEA OF.

  • BAḤR-E ṬAWĪL

    M. Dabīrsīāqī

    a type of Persian verse. generally the repetition of a whole foot (rokn) of the meter hazaj (ᴗ - - -) or of a whole foot of the meter ramal (- ᴗ - -) or a variation of the two.

  • BAHRA

    P. Clawson and W. Floor

    a term meaning “share,” “gain,” or “profit,” used within the economic context of Islamic Iran to mean “return on investment or production.”

  • BAHRAIN

    X. De Planhol, X. De Planhol, J. A. Kechichian

    Ar. Baḥrayn, lit. “two seas,” the name originally applied to the area of the northeastern Arabian peninsula now known as Ḥasā (Aḥsāʾ). i. Geography. ii. Shiʿite elements in Bahrain. iii. History of political relations with Iran.

  • BAHRĀM

    Multiple Authors

    name of six Sasanian kings and of several notables of the Sasanian and later periods. The name derives from Old Iranian Vṛθragna, Avestan Vərəθraγna, the god of victory.

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  • Bahrām I

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    the fourth Sasanian king and son of Šāpūr I.

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