Table of Contents

  • BAHĀRESTĀN-E ḠAYBĪ

    I. H. Siddiqui

    a detailed history in Persian of Bengal and Orissa for the period 1608-24 composed by Mīrzā Nathan ʿAlāʾ-al-Dīn Eṣfahānī.

  • BAHĀRI

    Mortażā Varzi

    , (ʿALI-) AṢḠAR (1905-1995) master of the kamānča (long-necked bowed lute).

  • BAHĀRLŪ

    P. Oberling

    a Turkic tribe of Azerbaijan, Khorasan, Kermān, and Fārs.  

  • BAHĀRVAND

    P. Oberling

    a Lur tribe now living mostly in the dehestāns (districts) of Kargāh and Bālā Garīva, south and southwest of Ḵorramābād.  

  • BAHDĪNĀN

    A. Hassanpour

    (Kurdish Bādīnān), name of a Kurdish region, river, dialect group, and amirate.  

  • BAḤĪRĪ FAMILY

    R. W. Bulliet

    a major Shafiʿite family of Nishapur in the eleventh century.  

  • BAHMAʾĪ

    P. Oberling

    a Lur tribe of the Kohgīlūya (Kūh[-e] Gīlūya).  

  • BAHMAN (1)

    J. Narten, Ph. Gignoux

    the New Persian name of the Avestan Vohu Manah (Good Thought) and Pahlavi Wahman.

  • BAHMAN (2) SON OF ESFANDĪĀR

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    son of ESFANDĪĀR, a Kayanian king of Iran in the national epic.  

  • BAHMAN (3)

    cross-reference

    author of Qeṣṣa-ye Sanjān.

  • BAHMAN (4)

    cross-reference

    “avalanche." See BARF.

  • BAHMAN JĀDŪYA

    M. Morony

    (or Jāḏōē), Sasanian general engaged in the defense of the Sawād of ʿErāq during the Muslim conquest in the 630s.  

  • BAHMAN MĪRZĀ

    ʿA. Navāʾī

    (d. 1883-84), the fourth son of ʿAbbās Mīrzā and brother of Moḥammad Shah (r. 1834-48). Throughout his relatively long exile, he enjoyed the protection and support of the Czarist government.

  • BAHMAN MĪRZĀ BAHĀʾ-AL-DAWLA

    ʿA. Navāʾī

    37th son of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah, born 1811 of Golbadan Bājī, originally a (Georgian?) slave girl of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah’s mother Mahd-e ʿOlyā. His diary contains notes on Qajar history.

  • BAHMAN YAŠT

    W. Sundermann

    Middle Persian apocalyptical text preserved in  Pahlavi script, a Pāzand (i.e., Middle Persian in Avestan script) transliteration, and a garbled New Persian translation.

  • BAHMAN-ARDAŠĪR

    M. Morony

    (or Forāt Maysān), ancient and medieval town and subdistrict in Maysān in lower Iraq. The town of Forāt is known from the first century A.D. as a fortified terminus for caravan trade on the left bank of the lower Tigris, eleven or twelve miles downstream from Charax.

  • BAHMAN-NĀMA

    W. L. Hanaway, Jr.

    epic poem in Persian of about 9,500 lines recounting the adventures of Bahman son of Esfandīār.

  • BAHMANAGĀN

    cross-reference

    See BAHMANJANA.

  • BAHMANID DYNASTY

    N. H. Ansari

    dynasty (1347-1528) in the Deccan, the tableland region in India. The Bahmanid kingdom was not only the first independent Muslim kingdom in southern India, but it was also one of the greatest centers of Iranian culture in the subcontinent.

  • BAHMANJANA

    Z. Safa

    Arabicized form of Mid. Pers. Bahmanagān, one of the Zoroastrian festival days which Muslim Iranians observed down to the Mongol invasion in 1219.