Table of Contents

  • ASĀWERA

    C. E. Bosworth

    Arabic broken plural form of a singular oswār(ī), eswār(ī), early recognized by Arab philologists as a loanword from Persian meaning “cavalryman.”

  • ʿAŠĀYER

    F. Towfīq

    “tribes” in Iran. 1. Definitions. 2. Historical background. 3. Population figures. 4. Territorial distribution: (a) Lor and Lak tribes; (b) Kurdish tribes; (c) Turkish tribes; (d) Arab tribes; (e) Baluch and Brahui tribes. 5. Organization. 6. Economy.

  • ASB

    A. Sh. Shahbazi, F. Thordarson, ʿA. Solṭānī Gordfarāmarzī, C. E. Bosworth

    “horse.”  From the dawn of history the Iranians have celebrated the horse in their art and in their literature.  i. In pre-Islamic Iran.  ii. Among the Scythians.  iii. In Islamic times.  iv. In Afghanistan.

  • ASB-SAVĀRĪ

    J.-P. Digard

    "horse-riding." The Iranian lands, in the course of their long history, have been the source of major advances in the techniques of equitation.

  • ĀŠBANAKKUŠ

    M. Mayrhofer

    name of an Iranian in the Persepolis Fortification Tablets.

  • ASBĀNBAR

    Cross-Reference

    See MADĀʾEN.

  • ASBĪĀN

    cross-reference

    See ĀBTĪN.

  • ĀŠEʿʿAT AL-LAMAʿĀT

    A. E. Khairallah

    (The rays of the flashes), a detailed commentary by Nūr-al-dīn ʿAbd-al-Raḥmān Jāmī (817/1414-898/1492).

  • ʿĀṢEM EFENDĪ

    T. Yazici

    (1168/1755-1236/1819), an Ottoman Turkish linguist and chronicler.

  • AŠƎM VOHŪ

    B. Schlerath

    the second of the four great prayers of the Zoroastrians, the others being: Ahuna vairyō (Y. 27.13), Yeŋˊhē hātąm (Y. 27.15), and Airyəˊmā išyō (Y. 54.1).