Table of Contents

  • ĀZĀDA

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    name of a Roman slave-girl of Bahrām Gōr.

  • AZADARAN-E BAYAL

    MAHYAR ENTEZARI

    (ʿAzādārān-e Bayal; The mourners of Bayal, Tehran, 1964). The collection comprises eight interconnected stories, called Qeṣṣa. Sharing characters and not unlike a novel, they revolve around the inescapable horrors of death, disease, drought, and famine in a fictitious village named Bayal.

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  • ʿAZĀDĀRĪ

    J. Calmard

    to hold a commemoration of the dead, by extension, mourning, a word deriving from Arabic ʿazāʾ, which means commemorating the dead.

  • ĀZĀḎBEH B. BĀNEGĀN

    C. E. Bosworth

    a dehqān (landowner) of Hamadān, marzbān (governor) in the former Lakhmid capital of Ḥīra in central Iraq during the years preceding the Arab conquest of that province.

  • ĀZĀDĪ

    N. Parvīn

    (Freedom), the name of the several Persian journals.

  • ĀZĀDĪSTĀN

    N. Parvīn

    the title of a Persian educational magazine which came out at Tabrīz in Jawzā, 1299/June-August, 1920.

  • ĀZĀDSARV

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    Two bearers of this name are known.

  • ĀZĀDVĀR

    C. E. Bosworth

    (or Āzaḏvār), a small town of Khorasan in the district (kūra, rostāq) of Jovayn, which flourished in medieval Islamic times, apparently down to the Il-khanid period.

  • AŻĀʿELḴᵛĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See MANĀQEB ḴᵛĀNĪ.

  • AZAL

    J. van Ess

    Arabic theological term derived from Pahlavi a-sar “without head” and meaning, already in early Muʿtazilite kalām, “eternity a parte ante,” as opposite to abad, “eternity a parte post.”