Table of Contents

  • ĀZ

    J. P. Asmussen

    Iranian demon known from Zoroastrian, Zurvanite, and, especially, Manichean sources.

  • ĀZĀD

    M. Bazin

    Zelkova crenata or Siberian elm, a tree of the Ulmaceae family, for which also other scientific names, such as Zelkova carpinifolia, Zelkova hyrcana, Planera crenata, and Planera Richardi, have been proposed.

  • ĀZĀD (Iranian Nobility)

    M. L. Chaumont, C. Toumanoff

    (older ĀZĀT), a class of the Iranian nobility.

  • ĀZĀD BELGRĀMĪ

    M. Siddiqi

    Major Indo-Muslim poet, biographer, and composer of chronograms, also known as Ḥassān-al-Hend (fl. 1116-1200/1704-86).

  • ĀZĀD FĪRŪZ

    A. Tafażżolī

    governor of Bahrain and the surrounding area in the time of Ḵosrow (probably Ḵosrow II Parvēz).

  • ĀZĀD KHAN AFḠĀN

    J. R. Perry

    (d. 1781), a major contender for supremacy in western Iran after the death of Nāder Shah Afšār (r. 1736-47).

  • ĀZĀD TABRIZI

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    physician, anthologist, and translator (b. Tehran, ca. 1854; d. Paris, 1936).

  • ĀZĀD, ʿABD-AL-QADIR

    Bāqer ʿĀqeli

    ABD-AL-QADIR AZAD published a newspaper, which he named Āzād (liberal, free), in Mašhad. In the editorials of this newspaper he attacked the government, and criticized the authorities severely. His paper was eventually banned by the newly-formed government of Reżā Shah Pahlavi, and ʿAbd-al-Qadir, who had by now assumed the name “Āzād” after his newspaper, was himself imprisoned.

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  • ĀZĀD, MOḤAMMAD-ḤOSAYN

    K. N. Pandita

    Scholar and writer in Urdu and Persian, born about 1834 in Delhi.

  • ĀZĀDA

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    name of a Roman slave-girl of Bahrām Gōr.