Table of Contents

  • ĀΘRAVAN-

    M. Boyce

    (Avestan) “priest” regularly used to designate the priests as a social “class,” one of the three into which ancient Iranian society was theoretically divided.

  • ĀTRƎVAXŠ

    W. W. Malandra

    (Mid. Pers ādurwaxš), one of the eight Zoroastrian priests (ratu) necessary for performance of the yasna ritual.

  • ATROPATENE

    Cross-Reference

    See AZERBAIJAN.

  • ATROPATES

    M. L. CHAUMONT

    the satrap of Media, commander of the troops from Media, Albania, and Sacasene at the battle of Gaugamela in 331 B.C.

  • ATRUŠAN

    J. R. Russell

    the Armenian word for “fire temple,” a loan-word from Parthian.

  • ATSÏZ B. ʿALĀʾ-AL-DĪN

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿALĀʾ-AL-DĪN ATSÏZ.

  • ATSÏZ ḠARČAʾĪ

    C. E. Bosworth

    ruler of Ḵᵛārazm with the traditional title Ḵᵛārazmšāh, 521 or 522/1127 or 1128 to 551/1156.

  • ATTABI

    E. Sims

    one of many names for cloth used by medieval Islamic writers.

  • AṬṬĀR, FARĪD-AL-DĪN

    B. Reinert

    Persian poet, Sufi, theoretician of mysticism, and hagiographer, born ca. 540/1145-46 at Nīšāpūr, and died there in 618/1221.

  • ʿAṬṬĀŠ

    J. van Ess

    Ismaʿili leader during the time of Sultan Barkīāroq (Berk-yaruq, d. 498/1104).