Table of Contents

  • ʿĀMERĪ NĪŠĀPŪRĪ

    H. Corbin

    (d. 381/992), important philosopher from Khorasan between Fārābī and Avicenna. 

  • AMƎŠA SPƎNTA

    M. Boyce

    an Avestan term for beneficent divinity, meaning literally “Holy/Bounteous Immortal” (Pahl. Amešāspand, [A]mahraspand).

  • AMESTRIS

    R. Schmitt

    no. 4. Niece of of Darius III, d. ca. 280 BCE. She was married to the Macedonian general Craterus, then to the tyrant Dionysius in Bithynia, and to Lysimachus, king of Thrace, before ruling alone in Paphlagonia.

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  • ʿAMĪD, ABŪ ʿABDALLĀH

    C. E. Bosworth

    known as Kolah (said to be an opprobrious term), secretary and official in northern Persia and Transoxania during the 4th/10th century.

  • ʿAMĪD-AL-DĪN ASʿAD

    Cross-Reference

    See ABZARĪ.

  • ʿAMĪD-AL-DĪN SANĀMĪ

    M. U. Memon

    Persian poet of India, panegyrist of Nāṣer-al-dīn Maḥmūd (r. 644-64/1246-66) and perhaps of Ḡīāṯ-al-dīn Balban (7th/13th century).

  • ʿAMĪD-AL-MOLK

    Cross-Reference

    See ABŪ BAKR QOHESTĀNĪ.

  • ʿAMĪD-AL-MOLK ABŪ ḠĀNEM

    Cross-Reference

    See ABZARĪ.

  • AMIDA

    D. Sellwood and EIr

    Pers. Āmed (modern Dīārbakr), town situated on a plateau dominating the west bank of the upper Tigris.

  • AMĪN AḤMAD RĀZĪ

    M. U. Memon

    better known as AMĪN RĀZĪ, 10th-11th/16th-17th century author of the Haft eqlīm, a famous geographical and biographical encyclopedia.