Table of Contents

  • AQ QOYUNLŪ

    R. Quiring-Zoche

    or WHITE SHEEP, a confederation of Turkman tribes who ruled in eastern Anatolia and western Iran until the Safavid conquest in 1501.

  • ʿĀQ-E WĀLEDAYN

    J. Calmard

    (ʿĀQQ-E WĀLEDAYN), Ar. “[the son] disobedient to [his] parents,” a theme in popular Shiʿite literature.

  • AQA

    D. O. Morgan

    Mongolian title, essentially meaning “elder brother” and by extension “senior member of the family.”

  • ĀQĀ BĀLĀ KHAN SARDĀR

    Ḥ. Maḥbūbī Ardakānī

    , MOḤAMMAD-ʿALĪ KHAN, Qajar official in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  • AQA BOZORG QĀʾEM-MAQĀM

    cross-reference

    See QĀʾEM-MAQĀM.

  • ĀQĀ BOZORG ṬEHRĀNĪ

    H. Algar

     (1293-1389/1876-1970), Shiʿite scholar and bibliographer.

  • ĀQĀ KHAN

    H. Algar

    title of the imams of the Nezārī Ismaʿilis since early 19th century.

  • ĀQĀ KHAN KERMĀNĪ

    M. Bayat

    (1854-55 to 1896), Iranian writer and intellectual, and an outstanding example of a first-generation secular nationalist. His main goal seems to have been the upholding of reason and modern science, both of which he viewed as directly and unavoidably opposed to religion. His lifetime struggle was in the name of Iran rather than Islam, which he came to blame for the political downfall and cultural decline of the Iranians.

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  • ĀQĀ KHAN NŪRĪ

    Cross-Reference

    (1807-1865), prime minister (ṣadr-e aʿẓam) of Persia (1851-58) under Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah Qajar. See EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, ĀQĀ KHAN NURI.

  • ĀQĀ MĪRAK

    P. P. Soucek

    prominent painter of the 10th/16th century in the workshop of the Safavid Shah Ṭahmāsp (r. 930-84/1524-76).