Table of Contents

  • ʿANKABŪTĪĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See ARACHNIDS.

  • ANKLESARIA, BAHRAMGORE TAHMURAS

    K. M. JamaspAsa and M. Boyce

    (1873-1944), Parsi scholar, son of Tahmuras Dinshah Anklesaria, born and educated in Bombay.

  • ANKLESARIA, PESHOTAN KAVASHAH

    K. M JamaspAsa and M. Boyce

    (1928-69), Parsi priest and scholar born at Broach.  

  • ANKLESARIA, TAHMURAS DINSHAH

    K. M. Jamaspasa and M. Boyce

    (1842-1903), Parsi priest and scholar.

  • ʿANNAZIDS

    K. M. Aḥmad

    (BANŪ ʿANNĀZ), a Kurdish dynasty (r. ca. 380-510/990-1117).

  • ANŌŠAG-RUWĀN

    C. J. Brunner

    "of immortal soul", originally a respectful euphemism, becoming in the Islamic period an aristocratic proper name.

  • ANŌŠAZĀD

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    (in the Šāh-nāma, Nōšzād; the name means “son of the immortal”), a son of Ḵosrow I Anōšīravān and leader of a revolt in ca. 550 CE.

  • ANŌŠĪRAVĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See ḴOSROW I.

  • ANQARAVĪ, ROSŪḴ-AL-DĪN

    H. Algar

    (also known as Rosūḵī Dede; d. 1041/1631), a shaikh in the Mawlawī order and author of the most important traditional commentary on theMaṯnawī of Jalāl-al-dīn Rūmī.

  • ANQUETIL-DUPERRON

    J. Duchesne-Guillemin

    (1731-1805), French orientalist, born in Paris on 7 December 1731. In June, 1759, he was able to send news to Paris that he had completed (in three months) a translation of that Vendidad.