Table of Contents

  • ABŪ SAHL ḴOJANDĪ

    C. E. Bosworth

    vizier of the Ghaznavids in the 5th/11th century. 

  • ABŪ SAHL KŪHĪ

    D. Pingree

    (also QŪHĪ), mathematician and astronomer.

  • ABŪ SAHL LAKŠAN

    Ḡ. Ḥ. Yūsofī

     official under the Ghaznavid amirs Maḥmūd (388-421/998-1030) and Masʿūd (421-32/1031-41).

  • ABŪ SAHL NAWBAḴT

    D. Pingree

    2nd/8th century astrologer and author.  

  • ABŪ SAHL NAWBAḴTĪ

    W. Madelung

    a prominent member of the Nawbaḵtī family and noted Imamite leader and scholar.

  • ABŪ SAHL ZŪZANĪ

    Ḡ. Ḥ. Yūsofī

    courtier and official under the Ghaznavid amirs Maḥmūd (388-421/998-1030) and Masʿūd (421-32/1031-41), d. ca. 440-50/1050-59.

  • ABŪ SAʿĪD ABI’L-ḴAYR

    G. Böwering

    famous Iranian mystic, born 1 Moḥarram 357/7 December 967 at Mēhana, a small town in Khorasan, about fifty miles west of Saraḵs, and died there 4 Šaʿbān 440/12 January 1049.

  • ABŪ SAʿĪD BAHĀDOR KHAN

    P. Jackson

    ninth Il-khan of Iran, the son and successor of Öljeitü (Ūlǰāytū).

  • ABŪ SAʿĪD JANNĀBĪ

    W. Madelung

    founder of the Qarmaṭī state in Baḥrain (b. between 230/845, and 240/855, d. 300/913 or 301/913-14). 

  • ABŪ SAʿĪD KHAN

    Y. Bregel

    cousin of Šaybānī Khan and great-grandson of Uluḡ Beg in the female line, khan of the Uzbeks of Transoxania (936-40/1530-33).  

  • ABŪ ŠAKŪR BALḴĪ

    G. Lazard

    poet of the Samanid period.

  • ABŪ SALAMA ḴALLĀL

    R. W. Bulliet

    head of the Hashemite propaganda organization (daʿwa) that sparkled the ʿAbbasid revolution and first vizier of the new dynasty. 

  • ABŪ ṢĀLEḤ MANṢŪR

    C. E. Bosworth

    Samanid prince, the cousin of the amir Aḥmad b. Esmāʿīl (295-301/907-14) and uncle of his successor Naṣr b. Aḥmad (301-31/914-43).

  • ABŪ ṢĀLEḤ MANṢŪR (I) NŪḤ

    C. E. Bosworth

    (350-66/961-76), Samanid ruler in Transoxania and Khorasan and successor of his brother ʿAbd-al-Malek after the latter’s death in Šawwāl, 350/November, 961.

  • ABŪ SALĪK GORGĀNĪ

    M. N. Osmanov

    Persian poet, contemporary of ʿAmr b. Layṯ the Saffarid (265-88/879-901). 

  • ABŪ ŠOʿAYB HERAVĪ

    J. W. Clinton

    or BŪ ŠOʿAYB as he is more commonly known, one of the many poets of the Samanid court which has survived virtually in name only.

  • ABŪ ŠOJĀʿ EṢFAHĀNĪ

    H. Halm

    (434-500/1042-43 to 1106, Shafeʿite jurist. 

  • ABŪ ŠOJĀʿ FANĀ ḴOSROW

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿAŻOD-AL-DAWLA.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER

    O. Watson

    Far from the works of the son following close upon those of the father, the gap between known works of the first generation is twenty-eight years, and between the second generations, forty-two years. Late marriage and long apprenticeships may be the explanation. However, the time gap would seem to indicate that the son did not learn his skills directly from father.

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  • ABŪ ṬĀHER B. MOḤAMMAD

    Cross-Reference

    See ATĀBAKĀN-E LORESTĀN.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER ḴĀTŪNĪ

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    officer, famous poet, and author in the reign of the Saljuq Sultan Moḥammad b. Malekšāh (498-511/1105-18).

  • ABŪ TAHER ḴOSRAVĀNĪ

    M. Dabīrsīāqī

    a poet of the Samanid period.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER SAMARQANDĪ

    M. Zand

    author of a book named Ṯamarīya (first half of the 13th/19th century).

  • ABŪ ṬĀLEB ḤOSAYNĪ

    Hameed ud-Din

    Mughal scholar chiefly famous for his alleged discovery of Malfūẓāt-e Tīmūrī or Wāqeʿāt-e Tīmūrī, an autobiographical account of Tīmūr from the 7th to the 74th year of his life.

  • ABŪ ṬĀLEB KALĪM

    Cross-Reference

    (b. ca. 1581-85; d. 1651), Persian poet and one of the leading exponents of the “Indian style” (sabk-e hendi). See KALĪM KĀŠĀNI.

  • ABŪ ṬĀLEB KHAN LANDANĪ

    M. Baqir

    Official and author in British India (18th-19th century).

  • ABU ṬĀLEB TABRIZI

    ʿA. Kārang

    Poet and physician whose pen name was Ṭāleb (d. 1015/1606-07).

  • ABŪ TORĀB NAḴŠABĪ

    B. Radtke

    noted 3rd/9th century ascetic.

  • ABŪ TORĀB WALĪ

    S. Moinul Haq

    noble in the service of Akbar and author of Tārīḵ-e Goǰrāt, a short history of that province from the reign of Bahādor Shah (932-43/1526-36), with an account of his wars against Homāyūn, through Akbar’s conquest and up to 992/1584.

  • ABU YAʿQUB HAMADĀNI

    H. Algar

    Important figure in the history of Iranian and Central Asian Sufism, largely neglected by both Iranian and Western scholarship (440-535/1048-49 to 1140).

  • ABŪ YAʿQŪB JORJĀNĪ

    J. van Ess

    disciple of Ebn Karrām (d. 255/869).  

  • ABŪ YAʿQŪB SEJESTĀNĪ

    P. E. Walker

    one of the most important of the early Ismaʿili dāʿīs.

  • ABU YAZĪD BESṬĀMI

    Cross-Reference

    See BESṬĀMĪ, BĀYAZĪD.

  • ABŪ YŪSOF QAZVINI

    W. Madelung

    Muʿtazilite scholar and author of an immense Koran commentary, born Šaʿbān, 393/June, 1003 (according to another report 391) in Qazvīn.

  • ABŪ ZAYD B. MOḤAMMAD KĀŠĀNĪ

    O. Watson

    perhaps the single most important luster potter of Kāšān known to us. More signed and dated works (from 587/1191 to 616/1219) are known by him than by any other potter, and his signature occurs on a greater variety of wares, including both tiles and vessels.

  • ABŪ ZAYD BALḴĪ

    W. M. Watt

    noted scholar in both Islamic and philosophical disciplines, but now known chiefly as a geographer. He was born in the village of Šāmestīān, near Balḵ in Khorasan, ca. 235/849 and died there in Ḏu’l-qaʿda, 322/October, 934. 

  • ABŪ ZAYD KĀŠĀNĪ

    O. Watson

    a potter who signed a ceramic bowl in the enameled (mīnāʾī) technique dated 4 Moḥarram 582/26 March 1186.

  • ABŪ ZAYN KAḤḤĀL

    L. Richter-Bernburg

    author of the medical text Šarāyeṭ-e ǰarrāḥī; its dedication to the Timurid Šāhroḵ (r. 807-50/1404-47) provides the only context for his life.

  • ABU'L-KHAYRIDS

    Yuri Bregel

    name used for the dynasty that ruled the khanate of Bukhara in 906-1007/1500-99. Until recently, this dynasty was incorrectly called in Western literature “Shaybanids” (or “Shibanids”).

  • ABŪZAYDĀBĀD

    E. Yarshater

    Oasis village of the province of Kāšān, called Būzābād for short and Bīzeva in the local dialect. It is situated 30 km to the east and slightly to the south of the city of Kāšān.

  • ABŪZAYDĀBĀDĪ

    E. Yarshater

    (Būzābādī for short), a variety of the local dialects of Kāšān province, spoken in the village of Abūzaydābād and its farms, and belonging to the Central or Median group of Iranian dialects.

  • ABU’L-ʿABBĀS ʿANBARĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿANBARĪ.

  • ABU’L-ʿABBĀS MARVAZĪ

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    Sufi, jurist, and traditionist, one of the first poets to write in New Persian. 

  • ABU’L-ʿALĀʾ ʿAṬĀʾ

    C. E. Bosworth

    secretary and poet of the Ghaznavid period, d. 491/1098.

  • ABU’L-ʿALĀʾ GANJAVĪ

    Ż. Sajjādi

    6th/12th century poet at the court of Ḵāqān Faḵr-al-dīn Manūčehr Šervānšāh. 

  • ABU’L-ʿALĀʾ HAMADĀNĪ

    L. A. Giffen

    saintly specialist in the science of Koran readings (qerāʾāt) and Tradition, born in Hamadān in 488/1090 and died in 569/1173.

  • ABU’L-ʿALĀʾ ŠOŠTARĪ

    M. Zand

    early Persian poet and prosodist (the earliest known from the Šoštar area).

  • ABU’L-ʿAMAYṮAL

    I. Abbas

    Tahirid court poet.

  • ABU’L-ʿANBAS ṢAYMARĪ

    D. Pingree

    astrologer and author, born at Kūfa, 213/828; died 275/889. 

  • ABU’L-BAQĀʾ

    H. Algar

    author of Jāmeʿ al-maqāmāt on the life of the Naqšbandī saint, Mawlānā Ḵᵛāǰagī Kāsānī (d. 949/1542), written in 1028/1618.