Table of Contents

  • ABŪ ŠOʿAYB HERAVĪ

    J. W. Clinton

    or BŪ ŠOʿAYB as he is more commonly known, one of the many poets of the Samanid court which has survived virtually in name only.

  • ABŪ ŠOJĀʿ EṢFAHĀNĪ

    H. Halm

    (434-500/1042-43 to 1106, Shafeʿite jurist. 

  • ABŪ ŠOJĀʿ FANĀ ḴOSROW

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿAŻOD-AL-DAWLA.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER

    O. Watson

    Far from the works of the son following close upon those of the father, the gap between known works of the first generation is twenty-eight years, and between the second generations, forty-two years. Late marriage and long apprenticeships may be the explanation. However, the time gap would seem to indicate that the son did not learn his skills directly from father.

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  • ABŪ ṬĀHER B. MOḤAMMAD

    Cross-Reference

    See ATĀBAKĀN-E LORESTĀN.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER ḴĀTŪNĪ

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    officer, famous poet, and author in the reign of the Saljuq Sultan Moḥammad b. Malekšāh (498-511/1105-18).

  • ABŪ TAHER ḴOSRAVĀNĪ

    M. Dabīrsīāqī

    a poet of the Samanid period.

  • ABŪ ṬĀHER SAMARQANDĪ

    M. Zand

    author of a book named Ṯamarīya (first half of the 13th/19th century).

  • ABŪ ṬĀLEB ḤOSAYNĪ

    Hameed ud-Din

    Mughal scholar chiefly famous for his alleged discovery of Malfūẓāt-e Tīmūrī or Wāqeʿāt-e Tīmūrī, an autobiographical account of Tīmūr from the 7th to the 74th year of his life.

  • ABŪ ṬĀLEB KALĪM

    Cross-Reference

    (b. ca. 1581-85; d. 1651), Persian poet and one of the leading exponents of the “Indian style” (sabk-e hendi). See KALĪM KĀŠĀNI.